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Friday, 20 April 2012 10:02

Trinity and Brazos 2.0 coming soon

Written by Peter Scott



Trinity already shipping


AMD is telling the world+dog that its next generation Trinity APUs are already shipping and we should see the first products based on the new chips soon. Revamped Brazos 2.0 APUs are also shipping as we speak and OEMs started getting the first batches last quarter.

There is no word on exact launch availability dates yet, AMD is just saying that the new chips will be available globally soon. Given the fact that AMD plans to introduce the new APUs this quarter, and that OEMs have already started receiving them, the launch could be just a few weeks away.

We already roughly know what to expect in terms of performance and we know pricing will be competitive to say the least, but the chips to really look out for are low-voltage Trinity APUs, with 18W and 25W TDPs.

These parts are destined for ultrathin notebooks and although they won’t match Intel’s Ivy Bridge parts in terms of performance, they could open the door to dirt cheap ultrathins with relatively good performance, especially in the graphics department. A $500 Trinity ultrathin sounds like a very good deal any time of the day.

Last modified on Friday, 20 April 2012 10:05
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